B is for Bridgewater Canal

Inspired by Roger Oldham’s ‘A Manchester Alphabet,’ I’m exploring this fair city, from A to Z. Read about my wanderings around Ancoats here.

Today’s post is brought to you by the ‘water taxi’ sign that I’ve passed on my way home from work, most evenings, for the past two years. I decided it was time to finally follow the sign and find out what these water taxis were and where they would take me.

Bridgewater Canal - waterfall

The waxis (that’s WAter taXIS), I learnt, leisurely glide up and down sections of both the Manchester Ship Canal and the Bridgewater Canal, stopping at points of interest along the waterways. Since Bridgewater starts with the letter ‘B,’ it provided the perfect opportunity for my next alphabetical exploration.

The canal stretches for over 40 miles between Runcorn and Leigh, with Manchester sitting at the heart of it. Commissioned by the 3rd Duke of Bridgewater, it was built as a means of transporting coal from his mines in Worsely, in to the city.

Bridgewater Canal - barges

My cousin came over for the day again and filmed our wanders, but I don’t think I’m going to invite her back. That girl is a rain magnet –  we had beautiful weather all week until she arrived on Sunday morning.

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Places we went, places you could go.

Mamucium, map
Strategically situated at a site overlooking the confluence of the rivers Irwell and Medlock, the Roman fort of Mamucium was built. Manchester was born here, in AD 79. Her first inhabitants, merchants and military. Today, you can see a reconstruction of the North gate and its ramparts, and walk around its foundations.

Mamucium

Manchester Museum of Science and Industry, here
Liverpool Road
Open daily 10am – 5pm

I’ve only been to MOSI once since I moved here which is a poor show on my part. We started our visit by fortifying ourselves with cups of tea in the Warehouse cafe where we also had some really tasty pastries. We spent a couple of hours taking in the exhibits and could have stayed longer if not for our water taxi booking. The museum has a number of talks and activities on throughout the day and whilst they are aimed at youngsters, we found them enjoyable and entertaining.
Manchester Museum of Science and Industry - entranceManchester Museum of Science and Industry - Tim Peake spacecraftManchester Museum of Science and Industry - engine

Manchester Water Taxi, here
A thoroughly enjoyable 50 minute boat ride took us from Castlefield to the Trafford Centre. Whilst it might not be the quickest way to get there, it’s certainly more fun than sitting in a car. Keep an eye out on their Instagram page because they often post discount codes for tickets. Also, it took us a minute to find the boarding point because of the direction we walked along the canal. The stop is round the corner from Albert’s shed,  where you’ll see their sign. Or, if you’re standing outside Barca, look across the canal and you’ll see a duck house – that’s where you need to wait.
Manchester Water Taxi #WAXI - arrivingManchester Water Taxi #WAXI - all aboard

Old Trafford
Though I technically live in the red part of town, I’ve never actually visited the stadium. The water taxi stops here however which would make a nice day out for a football fan -unless, I suppose, you support city.

The Trafford Centre
We only paused here for a comfort break on this occasion but I’ve been enough times before that I have a favourite parking area and place to eat.* Though I still haven’t had my picture taken on the staircase in the food quarter. Maybe next time? But probably not – can someone please explain the appeal??

Worsley
We skipped the village on this trip as the clouds were fast turning grey, but there’s plenty to see and do, enough for a day trip in itself. Including the Monton heritage trail which is a really pleasant walk on both cold wintery days and warm summer ones.

The Lancashire Mining Museum at Astley Green, here
Opening times: Tue, Thu, Sat, Sun: 1.30 – 5.00pm

Still a work in progress as volunteers continue to build new exhibits, but worth a visit to learn about local history. The surrounding area was once full of collieries, long since demolished. Now the museum houses Lancashire’s only surviving headgear (the steel frame in the picture below) and engine house where you can find a winding steam engine. It’s a thing of beauty and they run it on a few days throughout the year – I wish we could have timed our visit for one of those days. Although I’m not sure I dare go back. Seemingly, the reverberations of my coins hitting the bottom of the donation box sent two pin-boards flying off the wall of the visitors centre and crashing on top of a collection of commemorative plates. It was a heart stopping moment and luckily nothing broke but jeepers! That could’ve been baaaaaad.**
The Lancashire Mining Museum at Astley Green - entranceThe Lancashire Mining Museum at Astley Green - machinery

*the Orient car park. Perfectly placed in the middle of the centre so you can do a full circle and don’t have to walk back on yourself. Plus you enter/exit through the food court. Park in the section on the right and go all the way to the back – you’ll find a space  there whilst all the lazy bums fight for a spot closer to the entrance.

**what actually happened is that the command strips had given up at a most in opportune moment, but I still feel guilty.

Chatsworth, renewed.

Chatsworth House RenewedTime finally sprung forward last Sunday. The countryside basked in glorious sunshine to celebrate, as I pootled off to Chatsworth for my first ever InstaMeet. Husband, being the wonderful sort that he is, offered to drive me since I had been at work until 2am that morning. We enjoyed the winding roads of the pass in relative quiet. Most of the world was still asleep, it seemed.

Chatsworth DeerSat on the banks of the River Derwent, Chatsworth is the ancestral home of the Duke and Duchess of Derbyshire. 16 generations of the Cavendish family have lived in the property which, over the years, has hosted royalty, survived the great wars, was almost lost to death duties and has had starring roles on screen, both big and small.*

The last ten years have seen £32m and hours of craftsmanship spent carefully restoring and conserving the property’s 500 years of history. The scaffolding is finally down and the house is crowning in her full glory. To celebrate this renewal, Chatsworth and Visit England kindly provided some Instagrammers with the opportunity to frolic around  the house and grounds, and take pictures to our hearts content.

Chatsworth Column Detail

We were able to nosey around a few of the 126 rooms which are open to the public – the Duke and Duchess still live a private, closed off part of house.Chatsworth MusicChatsworth Grandfather Clock

The clocks all told the new summer time.Chatsworth Deer Chandelier

I loved the way little nuggets of information were displayed throughout the house.

Chatsworth Window Details

We posed for a group shot before lunch.

Chatsworth Instagrammers

{photo by @projectyasir}

And after all that walking around, it was time to enjoy a scone and some bubbles in the old stables, with new friends.

Chatsworth Scone

{photo by @tea_and_wanders}

Before spending an hour in the gardens.

Chatsworth GardenInteresting shape to choose for your shrubbery, no?

Chatsworth Maze (2)A quick turn about the maze and it was time for me to head off and meet my in-laws in Bakewell for a spot of Sunday lunch.

Chatsworth Maze

{photo by @tea_and_wanders}

Thank you @igersmcr and @igersderbyshire for organising such a fantastic day. I can’t wait for the next meetup, or my next trip to Chatsworth. I’ve got my eye on the afternoon tea for next time.

 

*Although the less said about the 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice, the better – Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle for life!!

Saturday at the footie

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Before this weekend, I had only ever been to one football match – in Antigua, Guatemala. We sat on bleachers with a blazing sun warming our faces, separated from the pitch by a large, barbed wire fence. There were men with guns policing the stadium and food vendors weaving their way through the crowds selling corn and vuvuzelas. A man, dressed as a giant avocado ran up and down the pitch to rally the crowd before the game started.

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{sun and football, not in England}

This Saturday, I went to my second ever football match. There was no blazing sun. No avocado man. Thankfully, no guns. But there were pies, tea and plentiful doggies running around.

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We’re in saving mode at the moment so apart from our January restaurant splurges, we’re looking for cheap and fun things to do. One of husband’s work colleagues mentioned he supports a local football team and recommended we attend one of their matches – the best bit, tickets are only a fiver.

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We cheered on West Didsbury and Chorlton FC as they won their first game of the year. It was so much more exciting than watching football on TV and we will definately be attending another match in the future, although perhaps not until the weather gets better. After the game we made our way over to Beech Road to escape the chill over some drinks. We found a table by a radiator and I warmed up my toes.

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